Organic Ozonides – How They Form, How They React

Chemistry
As you might guess, organic ozonides may be derived from ozone. So let's first consider the nature of ozone. The ozone molecule, O3 is bent and unstable. It is polarized and is quick to react with unsaturated molecules, notably alkenes and alkynes. The image provided illustrates the result. What, however, is the mechanism producing the result in a typical case?¹ Initially, all three oxygen molecules add to the alkene on the same side of what was previously a double bond. This structure, however, is a transient intermediate, which rearranges to form the ozonide structure. Ozonides are relatively stable. However, they can be readily split to yield a pair of carbonyl compounds. Organic Ozonides in Synthesis Some ozonides are explosive, so they are seldom isolated. However, ozonides can be made to…
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Organic Chemistry: What is a Lactam?

Chemistry
Most have never heard of a lactam. What is it? How can it be produced? Compounds are chemicals formed by combining two or more different atoms, the basic building blocks of matter. Organic compounds contain carbon, frequently bonded to itself, whether in chains, rings, or some other geometric structure. There are so many organic compounds, they must be categorized according to "functional groups." Functional groups are specialized structures within a compound that may contain a special atom, such as nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorous, etc. One kind of compound categorized by functional group is an amide. An amide results when an organic acid group reacts with a nitrogen-containing amine group and loses water. A lactam is a special kind of amide. It may serve as an intermediate in forming heterocyclic rings. Inorganic…
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